A postcard from Casablanca, with  an advertisment for absinthe, undated.
A postcard from Casablanca, with an advertisment for absinthe, undated. Supplied by the author.

On 28 June 1913 a decree was introduced in Tozeur, western Tunisia, by the French colonial government. It prohibited the import, sale, consumption and possession of alcohol ‘for any reason whatsoever’. Even giving away alcohol for free was forbidden. The penalties for breaking this new law were severe: fines ranged between 16 and 500 francs and lawbreakers faced prison sentences from six days to six months. Repeat offenders would receive a minimum sentence of one month in prison and a fine of 200 francs. The reason for these measures was French fears of excessive consumption of cheap, untaxed alcohol among the native Muslim population.

Katie Holyoak June 21, 2022 at 01:23PM History Today Feed

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.